Plantronics RIG 400HX (with Dolby Atmos) Review

Purchased February 2019, £37.99 from Amazon UK

I recently wrote about my headphones and thoughts on some new Beyerdynamic headphones that I purchased. However whilst I tend not to play multiplayer games that often, I very occasionally do need a microphone. Something that will work with console as well as PC. And so I recently purchased a pair of Plantronics RIG 400HX with Dolby Atmos. It is worth noting that these are the Xbox One branded variant of the RIG 400 although they will work with numerous devices with a 3.5mm audio jack. Although you may need to purchase a splitter for a separate microphone and headphone connection if you want to use on a PC.

Plantronics RIG 400HX box.

The RIG 400 is available in many different versions, including with and without Dolby Atmos. There is a slightly different looking version for PC which includes an audio splinter or a PlayStation branded version (RIG 400HS). They are all the same headphones though. However they can be purchased for under £33 at the time of writing if you don’t need Dolby Atmos.

Dolby Atmos is a code which can be redeemed on Xbox One or Windows 10 to unlock Dolby Atmos on any supported games on Xbox One or Windows App Store. The code isn’t needed for games on Steam or through other PC Storefronts (i.e. Overwatch from Blizzard supports Dolby Atmos). Dolby Atmos costs £14.24 as a one-off fee to unlock on Windows App Store and Xbox One so was another reason for considering this headset given I have previously considered buying the Dolby Atmos licence by itself.

The headset is very plasticky and light. The RIG 400 series is meant to be modular and the ear cups and headband can clip on and off, as well as being replaceable. However this means the headphones lack size adjustment beyond the three holes the ear cups can clip into and have no ear cup swivel. The extremely light weight of the headphones helps to make them very comfortable for prolonged use. The ear cups are a tad too small for my ears although the headband never once applied pressure to the top of my head. Overall they are quite comfortable and I am able to wear for long periods of time. The fact they are so lightweight being their main strength. The do have a cable coming out of each ear cup that is slightly irritating, but includes a useful mic mute switch and a very small volume slider.

Plantronics RIG 400HX

Sound quality is very flat and have quite a neutral sound with a little bit of bass. Nothing overpowering though. Sound separation and clarity is surprisingly good. This makes them suitable for gaming. Although overall I found they lacked depth and soundstage. But I was impressed with these being a budget headset. For music they are less impressive although when amped they do improve a little bit. Although they are fine watching films and TV. The RIG 400 are closed back although they do leak a lot of sound making them unsuitable for quiet environments. As a very low impedance headset they can be used with anything and I tested on my Xbox One X, PS4 Pro, PC (via the onboard and Creative SoundBlaster X7), tablet and Android mobile phone. However the over the top ‘gamer’ headset styling makes them unsuitable for using away from home, on looks alone.

I only used the detachable microphone a small amount so far but found it to be serviceable, certainly relaying my voice clearly for the recipient to hear me. That said I have read reports that the RIG 400 microphone can cause echo and feedback for other players hearing their own voice. However I wasn’t able to replicate this, but will return and update the review with further observations on the microphone, if required.

There is often a recommendation to stay away from ‘gaming’ headsets and get a set of headphones instead. And whilst I tend to agree this ignores that a headset can be more convenient in certain situations. It’s much like saying that quality is better with a Blu-ray film or music on CD. All true but ultimately makes light of the reason why these methods of consuming media are dying in comparison to streaming. And that’s what does appeal about these budget headphones. I rarely need to use them, they aren’t my main headphones, but they are more convenient. Sure you can buy a separate mic and adapter but it’s inevitably more wires and not as quick and easy to set-up. For me this budget option caters for the few times I need a microphone.

Dolby Atmos though is something which does elevate these headphones. As a software solution it really can help to improve videogame audio giving a really impressive virtual surround sound. I had no problem with being able to position or tell the height of where a sound is coming from. Dolby Atmos works with any headphones and is a bonus being included with these RIG 400HX’s. It would be great if more games on Xbox One made use of this software technology.

Competition wise the main competitor is probably the HyperX Cloud Stinger from Kingston. Which look more sturdy but lack Dolby Atmos in the box. Better quality closed back headset options exist like the HyperX Cloud II Gaming Headset and the Cooler Master MH751 but these are both above £60, even at their lowest prices. However if I was after something to be used more often it would probably be the latter that I would consider.

Overall I like the Plantronics RIG 400HX. Apart from allowing me to experience and unlock Dolby Atmos on Xbox One they are a good budget option, particularly on Microsoft’s platform. For the £38 I paid they feel like a bargain and I would happily recommend at this price as a budget headset for gaming. Particularly on console, if you need something convenient, cheap and with a microphone.

My Headphone Review Round-Up

Following a long-term recent review of my Creative Sound Blaster X7, I wanted to write about my thoughts on my current headphone line-up. Over the years I’ve used a number of good, bad, cheap and semi-expensive headphones along with various audio setups.

My current headphones include some of the more highly regarded stereo headphones in the entry to mid-price level that are often recommended for gaming. And seeing as I’ve just taken delivery of a new pair I though now was as good a time as any to go through them. Particularly as I have owned some of these for several years now.

The headphones reviewed here are:

  • Beyerdynamic DT 990 Pro
  • AKG K702
  • Sennheiser HD 598

Methodology explained

I’m not an audiophile so will try to outline my detailed impressions as clearly and as simply as I can.

  • These are all open backed headphones and let air into the headphones so you can hear the outside world, but the outside world can hear what you are listening to, i.e. sound leakage.
  • All have a wide soundstage and there is some similarity in how they handle videogame audio.
  • They are highly rated where it comes to positioning sounds for competitive multiplayer gaming.
  • None of these are ‘gaming’ headsets.
  • None of these include a built-in microphone so is something that needs to be factored in, whether it might be USB desk mic for PC gaming, or a detachable microphone like the Antlion ModMic. I rarely use a mic but it is something I will add in the future.

Although I have used some of these headphones with different external DAC & AMPs and Soundcards these have recently been used with my aforementioned Creative Sound Blaster X7 which has no trouble powering any of these headphones.

Beyerdynamic DT 990 Pro

Purchased January 2019, £101 from Amazon UK

My latest purchase and currently using quite heavily with all audio sources. First of all the headphones are deceptively light but appear very well built. A mixture of metal and plastic they have a lovely mostly black look to them. The distinctive grey ear cushions particularly standing out. The main headband that connects each ear cup is metal with a mostly plastic finish on the earcups.

The headphones are comfortable (second only to the Sennheiser HD 598) although this is subjective. However despite the DT 990’s supposedly having more clamping pressure than other Beyerdynamic DT headphones, these don’t feel too tight to me. Indeed the fit is OK even after a few hours. The earcups are round and smaller than the other headphones mentioned here and this can mean the edge of the earcups sit on the ears. However like all of these headphones they are very comfortable overall.

The sound produced by these headphones has more bass than the other two. And the Low frequency sounds also have more presence and impact. This makes them more fun for gaming although they still have a wide soundstage. The separation of sounds isn’t quite as easy with these though. Although I am still getting used to the sound signature there is a vibrancy and brightness to the output that I like. I found these headphones more of a mixed bag when listening to music than the Sennheiser or AKG’s although there isn’t a lot in it and I might like these more over time.

The DT 990 Pro are 250 ohm headphones which means they need to be amplified and the Creative Sound Blaster X7 copes very well with them. The included cable isn’t detachable from the headset and is coiled. This can make the cable seem heavy and be irritating in certain scenarios.

AKG K702

Purchased July 2015, £137 from Amazon UK

At the time of writing this, these headphones are now only £105 on Amazon UK. So right in that competitive price bracket and can be directly compared to the Beyerdynamic DT 990 Pro headphones. I’ve had this set for over three and half years and they are my favourite headphones. Mainly due to the neutral output and reference sound. But with a super wide soundstage it feels like you can hear everything going on around you with extreme clarity.

In terms of comfort they apply very little to no clamping pressure which means they can feel looser than other headphones particularly as they are so lightweight. The round ear cups are massive and the foam used is super plush on your ears. This is all good. However the K702 had a leather headband that adjusts when placed on your head. During prolonged wearing I find this feels like it’s pushing down on the top of my head. As long as I take a break or adjust the headphones I can get around this. Again they are very comfortable in the main and at least the K702’s lacks the bumps on the underside of the leather strap that the older models used to have.

The sound is very detailed and I find this makes them perfect for gaming and they are great for music too. They seem to thrive with Dolby Digital and SBX. There is no heavy bass and whilst this might make them less ‘fun’, I still really enjoy the sound. They seem to output the sound as the creator intended. They are renowned for being like a ‘god mode’ for competitive multiplayer games due to how easily you can make out where other players are.

The headphones include a detachable mini-XLR cable that can be replaced. One observation is that the small elastic strings that support the leather band adjustment appear to be very thin in places on mine and therefore I imagine might break at some point. But as they have lost tightness, I’ve used some elastic bands to re-tighten them. Therefore I think even though I treat all these things with kid gloves the AKG K702’s, whilst of high build quality, are more delicate than the other two models mentioned here. These have a 62 ohm impedance but I have used them with an Astro MixAmp or Laptop and whilst usable they can be improved with an amplifier to give that extra power. But either way these have been my go to headphones for gaming for a while now.

Sennheiser HD 598

Purchased April 2012, £167.99 from Amazon UK

I’ve had these for nearly seven years. Although now discontinued there are similar models in Sennheiser’s current line-up. I used them for a long-time and are really very capable all-rounders. They excel at gaming, movies and music.

These are probably the most comfortable headphones I ever tried. The ear cups are Sennheiser’s instinctive oval shape and the headband has a soft material which you never feel. Again very light weight so they can be worn for hours. My only minor niggle is the ear cups aren’t as thick as other headphones and the inside of the earcups has no padding, not that your ear should touch this. The cable has a 2.5mm phone jack with a proprietary connector but can be disconnected. The beige and brown walnut look is distinctive but I can imagine not to everyone’s taste.

Again a very wide soundstage so making out where sounds are coming from isn’t an issue, which is ideal for gaming. They are fairly flat sound with little bass. Although the sound is not as neutral as the AKG K702 and warmer. As they have a 50 ohm impedance these are less fussy and don’t necessary need an amp but will be improved by one.

They aren’t as fun as the Beyerdynamic DT 990 Pro’s or as clinical as the AKG K702’s so as I don’t want to build a headphone collection I might sell these on. But again highly recommended and I do love their sound.

Summary

I feel like the AKG, Beyerdynamic and Sennheiser headphones I’ve mentioned cover some of the more popular models. The AKG K702 and Beyerdynamic DT 990 Pro particularly represent some of the better value choices for headphones on the market although any of these headphones are a great purchase. I’m not personally convinced that spending two, three or many times more on expensive headphones would be worth it just for gaming.

Thoughts on other headphones

  • I did purchase Philips Fidelio X1 headphones in January 2014. The ear cup material was a harsh feeling velour but they were comfortable. I found the sound output a bit muddier, lacking some separation and heavier bass in comparison to my other headphones. I think they were better for music and movies than gaming. I sold them on 18-months later. It sounds like the newer Fidelio X2 headphones may have been improved but at much higher prices it puts them up against some tough competition in my view. Particularly models like the AKG K712 and Sennheiser HD 600 headphones.
  • I also had the Astro A40 headphones which I purchased with an Astro MixAmp 5.8 and whilst they were a step up from what I had at the time, they aren’t even in the same ballpark as the headphones I have mentioned here.
  • I think the Audio-Technica ATH-M40X are very intriguing. Although closed back headphones, they are generally well regarded and have a certain degree of portability. And for me they would be usable in scenarios where I didn’t want sound leakage and therefore an interesting option. Also they have an RRP of under £90.