July Update

After numerous hours typing away at the keyboard I have finally managed to log every videogame I own on Grouvee. Yay! Tooks ages but hopefully worth it.

There are some Nintendo Virtual Console games on Wii and Wii U unaccounted for, but I’m not going to list them as these online services are either gone or probably won’t be around much longer.

So that’s 1035 games in total, of which 275 are on my backlog. I’m currently playing through 7 games and actually have already completed nearly a fifth of all games I own. Time to start playing some games.

Xbox Ultimate Game Sale/PSN Summer Sale – new game pickups

Just because you can clearly never buy enough games to play, I have also purchased the following in the summer sales;

  • Prey – fancy playing this, not worried about Mooncrash DLC atm.
  • Doom/Wolfenstein 2 Bundle – good price for two!
  • Dishonored The Complete Collection – Dishonored 2 is Xbox One X enhanced, and only £1 more than the complete sequel bundle so it includes the original game as well.
  • Everybody’s Golf

I also purchased Fallout 4/Dying Light: The Following – Enhanced Edition digitally in these sales so I can own sell the boxed disc versions.

Ps. Picked up 3-months of GamePass for £7.99, plus a month through MS Rewards, so that’s 4-months taken care of. Seems a good deal. That’s Forza Horizon 4 taken care of at least.

Thoughts on games trackers

So where to begin when listing all the games you own?

It was a question I’ve had to answer when setting up this website. Lots of options like using a simple spreadsheet, or categories on Steam. However all of these have limitations. One thing I have realised is that there simply isn’t a perfect videogame tracking website. At least for me.

These are my thoughts on the websites I tested:

Backloggery.com
Probably the most well known website for tracking your videogame collection and backlog. I love the simple categorisation and presentation of whether you have beaten or unfinished a game. Has a great one page summary view that can be personalised. The ability to add notes to games or even whether a game is part of a compilation. However I don’t like the presentation style. Obviously aiming for a retro look, but I think it feels slightly dated in use.

HowLongToBeat.com
The strength of this site is it’s community data with regards to how long a game takes to playthrough. It is a very useful reference site in this regard. Nice presentation style, although one minor niggle is you can’t link games to more that one format, therefore creating duplicate entries.

Grouvee.com
Very clean presentation style and layout (Good Reads for videogames basically). Love the fact you can add notes and images to games, use tags, and record games as being owned on multiple different formats. Uses the Giantbomb database for records, so haven’t yet found a game that isn’t on the site. And even after using the site for only a few days, I’ve already observed there is a helpful community who actively comment or respond on profile updates.

Backloggery and HowLongToBeat are free, although you can make donations. Grouvee is also free, but has a $10 yearly subscription that removes adverts and rewards the user with a profile badge.

My conclusions

I decided that Grouvee best meets my needs for tracking my videogame collection backlog. With the ability to tag my games, using their ‘shelves’ system, I’ve been able to simply prioritise the games I want to play or complete the most. And the social features are the strongest of the sites I tested.

However for tracking my physical videogame collection I am still going to use Google Sheets. Simply because this can be used to store custom data such as where and when I purchased a game or hardware, where from and what condition etc. There are more collector oriented websites and programs out there but they are more than I need at the moment.