This newb just got a bit more powerful

Sorry another The Elder Scrolls Online update. I’ve finally completed the main campaign from the original game and I just had to write about it! On top of the recent reaching Champion Points 160 (i.e. Endgame) it feels like another major milestone in the game has been checked off.

Without sounding like a broken record but I think I have come to conclusion that the progression system just might be one of the best I’ve ever encountered in a videogame. Certainly the best in an MMO in my opinion. The vertical and horizontal progression in this game is immense.

Although the game can be a slow grind what has finally started happening in the last month is a massive payoff after years of playing the game. And it’s something I’ve not seen in other games. These recent achievements have included; completed the faction quest line, maxed out my class and armour skill lines, hitting Champion Points 160, maxing 3 main crafting skill lines (Woodworking, Clothier & Blacksmithing), being able to straight away craft my Law of Julianos set (solid PVE endgame gear set) and completing the main storyline. And so on. All of the milestones falling in quick succession after what seems like forever working towards them. On top of all of this and I’ve finally been able to earn my first Indrik mount from event tickets only after starting to work on this recently.

Overall it feels like a wonderful time for me in The Elder Scrolls Online. And tonight I hit an EU Megaserver login queue (c.8 minutes) which is a good sign of health for the overall game. I think that this is simply my favourite MMO at the moment and my Live Service game of choice for now.

There is still loads for me to do. To start working through DLC and expansion content, try to find some proper Legendary Endgame Weapons and Gear and most of my current setup is a mix of greens, blues and purples (fine, superior and epic quality respectively). I’m also in desperate need of mats for upgrading gear, or in-game gold to buy them. And most importantly Skill Shards to keep improving my crafting attributes. And a few Alts to level. Simply loads although whatever happens I’ve certainly had value and massive enjoyment from this game.

The only negative is I just might be burned out on The Elder Scrolls Online as the third expansion (Chapter); Elsweyr lands next month (on PC). Oh well there are worse problems to have I guess.

Borderworlds

Something must be in the air as recently I’ve started to think about the Borderlands videogames again. And no, this was before I found out about the long-rumoured next game being unveiled today. It was a videogame series I hadn’t really thought about after completing all the content of the second game nearly four years ago (aka True Vault Hunter Mode). In fact not only that but spoiler alert, I’ve purchased The Handsome Collection on PlayStation 4 a few days ago and have been playing it.

I still remember playing the first game upon release. It was a game I fell in love with instantly. The second game although largely more of the same did everything better and had a much more enjoyable and memorable story. Primarily due to the brilliant main villain and resurrecting notable characters from the first game. Simply put Borderlands 2 is one of my favorite games of all time. Indeed when I get around to compiling that list and publishing here as a post one day, you’ll likely see that game somewhere in my thoughts.

Borderlands 2 screenshot

Borderlands was far from perfect and the sequel very felt like a live service game before there really were live service games, i.e. mountains of DLC and add-ons sold for the sequel. However going back to play Borderlands 2 in 2019 still reveals a very solid, super fun, loot-o-rama of a first-person shooter with some wonderful set pieces. The bosses, story and humour all combine brilliantly. And no matter what level the rewards feel worthwhile with an abundance of uniquely crafted guns. Any item drop can be a potentially better weapon and upgrade your character. Borderlands even to this day has unique importance placed on its massive storylines. Unlike other loot based games where the story is more of a tutorial on the way to the endgame.

Yet that endgame is precisely one big area where a new Borderlands will need to improve upon. I don’t think replaying the whole story again is going to cut it anymore. It will need a more dynamic way of players engaging with the game after the story has ended.

Did you say Boom?

I thought about writing what I would like to see in a new instalment, but really I just want to be surprised. I would love to see the same level of innovation and execution that helped to launch the series back in 2009. 2K Games and Gearbox have released three Borderlands games that have all largely been exactly the same formula and not really changed anything from the original game. Whilst that might have worked on releases separated by a few years I do think Gearbox must do more on any future game particularly as times have moved on.

Although from a consumer point of view, that brings about probably the major worry. Will the next Borderlands be a microtransaction-riddled nightmare? As we’ve seen time and time again recently the balance between developers and publishers desire to make profits and not ruining a game’s design is very difficult to get right. Also ‘supporting’ a new game with actual new regular content and not just new events and microtransactions will be important in my view.

Either way, I look forward to seeing what Gearbox has been working on. If they can build on the uniqueness of Borderlands then it might be time to return. Vault Hunter.

Bad Influence

Twitch has helped to bring about a revolution in the way we can keep up with video gaming. It’s easy to watch very skilled players, eSports tournaments or learn about new games. It has given options to those fed up with videogames being ignored by mainstream media. And along with YouTube makes it exceptionally easy to watch videogames.

For older gamers it seems clear to me the success of Twitch is sometimes met with confusion. That success is certainly quantifiable in cultural impact and it’s clear some people wonder why streamers receive donations just to ‘play games’. Ironically not comprehending that Twitch (along with Discord and Reddit) are for many younger gamers the new videogames forums. People are just as likely to engage in the community than be on Twitch for the streamer.

The news that Ninja was paid $1 million by EA for advertising Apex Legends, has again really brought home just how MUCH money people are making from Twitch. Likely a fraction of what a more mainstream celebrity would be paid but nevertheless raises eyebrows. Whether people are earning too much is definitely a popular debate that keeps being raised whatever your view.

As I have found myself using the service more and more over the past few years I have started to think about the impact. On the plus side it is an easy way to find out about new games and very quick to engage with a new community of videogame fans through Twitch chat. I have often found that I have been able to easily ask specific questions about new games.

However it seems to come at a price. Firstly, I am very aware of what a time sink it can be. It’s so easy to spend more time watching a livestream than a video on demand but this might not be the biggest issue. Perhaps the most obvious negative is that games are spoilt. The sense of surprise and discovery taken away. In addition I have noticed it’s also common for other popular media to be spoilt as well. It seems many don’t think about spoilers when blurting out the ending to the latest movies in chat. Which can make watching Twitch the equivalent of a game of chance when it comes to avoiding spoilers in popular media.

Also I don’t want to watch paid adverts. There arguably needs to be much clearer warning than having ‘#ad’ in the title. And I am not convinced these streaming sites are doing anywhere near enough to police their own users.

Twitch definitely has some unique content and it can be a fun platform. Not just watching games being played but also real life events. However more and more I am conscious of the negatives. And that’s the point I’m at with this blog post.

So with this in mind I’ve started to make a concerted attempt to stop using Twitch. Overall it feels like it will be a more worthwhile use of my time and may help playing my actual games instead.

Six months with a gaming laptop

Last year I decided that it was time to relook at PC gaming. With steadily rising component prices and new pricing tiers being introduced I realised that I wanted to get off the high-end PC gravy train. And use it as an opportunity to downsize my big desktop gaming PC. So last August I purchased a ASUS Strix GL703GS Scar Edition laptop. Ideally more than I wanted to spend but I wasn’t quite ready to give up on PC gaming, even if this was a downgrade on what I had before.

Since getting my first PC in 1996, I’ve always owned desktop PCs for gaming. And therefore I thought it might be interesting to note my thoughts on the transition from desktop to laptop after using this gaming laptop for just over six months.

Well the negatives first. It’s mostly the NOISE! A ‘gaming’ laptop like this is packing a high end Intel i7 CPU with a full size desktop GPU. And unfortunately that creates heat. Lots of it and in a small space. This means the ASUS laptop relies on 3 fans to cool the machine (2 connected via heat pipes). For normal desktop use it is bearable, however play a game and the thing will ramp up the fans immediately. It’s here the ASUS Strix can give a PS4 Pro or original Xbox 360 a run for its money in the ‘hairdryer’ noise stakes. This thing becomes very loud. Although I suspect there are quieter gaming laptops out there most will generate noise given the heat and small form factors involved.

That said the laptop hasn’t seen many hot days. With my old PC sometimes in the summer heat waves I’d take the side panel off the case to help it run cooler. Hopefully that isn’t something I need to worry about here, but we will see.

The ASUS Strix has a poor battery life. I can get over 2 hours from it but if you attempt gaming then even that will reduce. The battery is also an additional cost that has to be factored in one day as it will likely need replacing. The trackpad is OK but nothing as nice a MacBook or more business oriented laptops.

However you are no longer the main support for the machine. If something goes wrong you can’t fix it and have to send back under warranty. You also can’t upgrade anything bar the memory or storage. Although in some ways these last two points can be seen as benefits.

So what have been the positives from owning the ASUS Strix? The main one is obviously portability. Even tied to plug socket the machine is able to be used away from home. I recently spend a weekend with family and it was a boon being able to play The Elder Scrolls Online whilst away from home. Furthermore I can easily decamp to elsewhere around the house.

It is also easy to use as a desktop. I’ve kept my old ASUS monitor and Corsair keyboard to use with the laptop. A cheap laptop cooling pad and a 10-port Anker USB 3.0 hub act as my cheap docking bay solution. This even gives me a second screen if required.

Elsewhere my observations are a pretty ‘bloat free’ Windows 10 installation and a nice IPS 1080p display. 1080p is a lot easier to drive than 4K and opens up much cheaper PC options. Indeed a laptop with an Nvidia GTX 1060 is probably perfect for this resolution. Anything more powerful just gives you a bit more frame rates or headroom when playing games. The onboard audio is actually surprisingly good quality, even able to comfortably drive my Beyerdynamic DT 990 Pro headphones.

So the obvious question; would I buy a laptop PC again in the future for gaming? The answer is currently a clear ‘YES’.

Ideally a non-gaming PC laptop paired with a desktop PC for gaming is probably preferable. Although this gaming laptop fits the bill for a scenario where I only want one PC and want it to do a bit of everything, including gaming. And therefore I can definitely state that I am now a fan of gaming laptops.

The Elder Scrolls foretold of this newb

I’ve written about The Elder Scrolls Online before. However recently I’ve been playing the game again and have passed two milestones. Firstly I’ve hit Champion Points (CP) level 160 on my main character. And secondly it dawned on me that it was just a little over 2 years ago since I purchased the game in February 2017 (PC version).

I stumbled across The Elder Scrolls Online at a time when I wasn’t really looking for a new game. However a big discount in a sale felt like a good excuse to check it out. And part of me wished I had found it sooner because this has been of one of the most enjoyable MMO experiences to date.

Getting to CP160 is a big deal. Whilst the game has a maximum character level of 50, the reality is the whole of the game is scaled to this CP160 level. Champion Points are a bit like the paragon system in Diablo 3 and serve as an account wide horizontal levelling system where you can attribute points earned from experience levelling into new abilities that improve an aspect of your character. At certain points they can also unlock other passives. All your characters can contribute to earning more Champions Point experience once they are level 50. However all gear and weapons are locked to CP160 meaning at this point only rarity or set bonuses can improve your gear and weapon stats.

The Elder Scrolls Online PC Version. Screenshot of a dungeon in Tamriel. With lots of add-ons.

There is still a lot for me to do in the game. Indeed I’ve still yet to complete the final area and main storyline. And whilst I’ve completed everything from my faction’s questline I’ve still got the other two faction quests and zone to do. Or guilds, or the DLC. And 2 expansions I’ve barely touched. But the truth is that I can keep playing the game as a solo PVE player enjoying quests, and exploring the world, whilst still progressing my character. There are hundreds of hours worth of quests.

And that is the other thing that has struck me about The Elder Scrolls Online. Its progression system is simply marvellous. Even at endgame there is rarely ever a time when your aren’t progressing something. For example I may have levelled all my class skill lines and two staff weapon skill lines. However I have barely put any skill points into crafting. So I’ll need to earn more skill points in order to get to endgame crafting. But compared to other MMOs like Guild Wars 2 or World or Warcraft progression feels frequent and fast. In those games it can feel like ages between progressing something and even then there are no points to customise your character or obvious reward. Whilst these great games do their own thing well, even something as basic as gear can flow in The Elder Scrolls Online. Even if it isn’t useful the materials it’ll break down into or gold it will sell for are.

The Elder Scrolls Online isn’t without its issues. And chief amongst my criticisms are the lootboxes with insanely unfair and extremely poor odds. However Zenimax Online Studios seem to be in a good place with The Elder Scrolls Online right now. The yearly expansion format since 2017’s Morrowind seems to be working well. And whilst last year’s Summerset or 2019’s upcoming Elsweyr don’t have the nostalgic pull of the first expansion, sorry Chapter, the game seems to be healthy with active players. I even had to join a queue upon logon a few days ago.

Whilst many MMO’s prioritise group PVE content, I think The Elder Scrolls Online knows a significant chunk of its player base are solo players wanting to experience the lore and world. And whilst it offers lots of group PVE content (Dungeons, World Bosses & Events, Trials/Raids) and large scale faction vs faction PVP. It also tries to cater for solo PVE players at all stage of the game with solo dungeons, fully voice acted quests/storylines and dynamic zones that scale to solo players as well. And in this sense it’s great even for the more casual player.

As a reward for my recent achievements I’ve gone ahead and pre-ordered Elsweyr. I am looking forward to lots more questing and seeing more of what The Elder Scrolls Online has to offer.

A few next generation hopes

Recently Digital Foundry released a wonderful video suggesting six relatively realistic upgrades they would like to see on any future Nintendo Switch hardware revision. Which got me thinking what is it I would love to see on the next generation Xbox and PlayStation. Particularly changes that are realistic and within the realms of possible.

Whilst I love gaming on PC, I’ve made no secret of the fact that I’m fed up with high-end PC pricing. Sure you don’t have to have the best components, and I often don’t, but even low and mid-range parts have increased in price. And if you’re buying less powerful parts then the advantages over consoles when gaming become less. Over the last 12-months I’ve spent more time on my Xbox One X and PlayStation 4 Pro as I’ve moved away from gaming as much on my PC.

Whilst hardware is definitely going to be more powerful in the next Xbox and PlayStation I’ve realised that it isn’t just hardware that I would like to see improve when new machines arrive in the next 1 to 2 years. Actually software and services are just as important. Therefore I’m not going to list improvements like a faster CPU or more RAM as realistically these things improving are a given, particularly as we know AMD Zen CPU and Navi GPU components are extremely likely to be in these new machines. Anyway here is my small wishlist for each machine and manufacturer:

Microsoft Xbox

More exclusives. Microsoft announced at E3 a load of studios that it had acquired. And whilst some of these are likely to be working on their new cloud streaming services and content, there is hopefully a chance they are also working on new IP for Microsoft machines. Microsoft has fallen well short of the mark when it has come to new games this generation and is in the shadow of Sony’s incredible first party studios content since 2013.

Xbox Game Pass merged with Xbox Live Gold as a single premium subscription. Probably unlikely but I did see someone on ResetEra thinking along the same lines. The consumer charges for online multiplayer are ‘snake oil’. The cost that the consumer pays a platform holder in the 30% fees they charge are enough for server maintenance for first-party games. If Microsoft got rid of fees for multiplayer and built around their Game Pass initiative they would give Sony a real problem and offer something unique. It becomes less about charging something the consumer resents paying and making the consumer more positively see the service so they want to subscribe.

Support for USB DACs, AMPs and Microphones. One of the great things about the PlayStation 4 is being able to use USB audio devices like the Fiio E10K or Creative SoundBlaster X7. Microsoft’s proprietary audio chip and solution isn’t just a barrier to great audio on Xbox but a real pain for those of us with more than one format.

Completely redesign the dashboard operating system. Even though the Xbox dash has improved in recent years it still pales in comparison to Sony’s clear and simple OS design. Like Microsoft’s convoluted vision for the Xbox One, the operating system was clearly designed around Metro, Kinect and selling services. Metro and Kinect were failures and adverts on dashboards aren’t consumer friendly. Although Sony’s design is far from perfect you are never more than one click away from your games.

Sony PlayStation

Better acoustic profile. Even though my PlayStation 4 Pro is generally silent or quiet with PS4 games, once any enhanced game is loaded the whole thing becomes very loud. The original launch PS4 was too loud when compared with the original Xbox One as well.

Backwards compatibility with PS1 and PS2 games. Microsoft has been more innovative on the services and software front in many ways. Game Pass, Backwards Compatibility and Xbox One X enhanced 4K Xbox 360 and Xbox games are things Sony simply has little response to. However there should be no reason for why Sony can’t offer PS1 or PS2 emulation on its new hardware. Maybe even bundling up some of its old library as a PlayStation Plus freebies rather than trying to sell as ROMS. Either way Sony needs a way to allow its consumers to access old content that is more compelling than the expensive PS Now service. Talking of which…

Make PS Now cheaper. £12.99 feels too much per month for what the service is, but worse still compares very badly with Microsoft’s Xbox Game Pass which is nearly 40% cheaper per month and includes brand new releases. Whilst PS Now has around 750 games available (most streaming only) there are barely any PS2 games on the service and there are no new day and date releases as per Xbox Game Pass.

Greater cross-play support. Again this isn’t dependant on new hardware, but new Live Services need to think about the consumer over their potentially long lifetime. And almost in the same way Xbox One and PlayStation 4 heralded a new age of console free-to-play games, by the time new machines arrive we should be able to play with friends and access our accounts and purchases irrespective of format. Although given the confusion recently it’s clear the scale of the challenge facing developers and publishers working with Sony.

Summary

So there we go, eight things I would personally like to see these new Sony and Microsoft console incorporate. There is arguably a policy change that Sony should and could make sooner with regards to cross-play, although this is also on Publishers as well. However these all feel like solid suggestions that could improve the new consoles from each manufacturer.

What would you like to see implemented or change with new consoles?

Party like it’s 1999

I remember playing the original Unreal Tournament in 1999 as if it was (almost) yesterday. Released at a similar time to Quake 3 Arena which was another seminal multiplayer twitch shooter. Neither game had a campaign and helped to usher in a new era of more multiplayer focused games. I have fond memories of the original Unreal Tournament. Maybe not as technically proficient as Quake 3 but was arguably the more fun of the two games with more weapon variety. Both games had many options for solo offline players with extensive AI-bot support and different modes.

Unreal Tournament screenshot

So having seen a streamer on Twitch recently play the new Unreal Tournament, which was first announced in 2014, I thought it would be worth a look. Particularly as it is a completely free game and available to anyone on the Epic Game Store.

I’m not sure where it ranks in the series of UT games. Also it is clearly unfinished in its pre-alpha state with menus looking rough and having placeholders within the UI. However even with all of that, it is incredibly fun and even better has a few of the old maps available to play.

It also has extensive solo modes against bots including challenges and the ability to set-up Capture The Flag, Team Deathmatch and Deathmatch modes. All with a XP progression system where you can unlock cosmetic items for your character on the way. Although don’t expect anything too extensive from this.

Whatever the current development state of the game it has still been immense fun playing an old-school, twitch, multiplayer shooter again. Particularly with some very customisable bot modes. It feels very familiar. There are things I could nit-pick at, such as the movement set where you struggle even to make simple jumps but I think that would miss the point given the game’s current state. It is a shame we live in a world where the success of Fortnite has apparently helped stop the development of this UT reboot since 2017. The Unreal Tournament subreddit has much more detail on this.

Anyway if you’re a fan of the UT series this is worth a look. Completely free on the Epic Game Store.

As a slight aside it also is one of only two games I’ve seen support my Corsair K65 Mechanical Keyboard out of the box. UT changes the key colours to highlight movement keys (WASD) and weapon numbers. A neat touch is that the colours match the weapon in the game.

Two more games trackers

When I originally launched this site I checked out a few of the different Games Trackers and noted my thoughts about them. I would then add to this when I came across the AllMyGames which I wrote about in November last year.

Since then I stumbled into this discussion thread on ResetEra: ‘We are getting closer to a Letterboxd for games’. This peaked my interest because also since setting up this site I have discovered Letterboxd and love logging movies I have watched in the Diary view. As well as tracking what’s coming up. Although as I’m not a serious movie fan my use case is limited.

However this led to trying out two new Game Trackers.

GG

Interestingly this advertises itself as Letterboxd for games. Like both of the game tackers mentioned here I love the visual presentation style, lots of screenshots, clean and simple design which seems to extend through to the feature set. The are some basic categories for Beaten, Completed etc. and the ability to add lists and make these public. And you can also follow your friends on the site to see what they are up to.

I do feel the site is a bit basic in what you can do at the moment. You can’t track how long you’ve played the game for, or record what format you own a game on. Also lacking an import from a platform feature so everything has to be logged manually. However a strength here is that it has its own mobile app on Android and iOS.

IGDB

Again a really nice presentation style. Kind of a cross between Twitter meets Letterboxd. Like GG mentioned above this seems quite basic at the moment in terms of the feature set but the developer seems very active and has mentioned big changes are coming for 2019. There is nowhere to log time played or other metadata. And it could do with more categories (called Activity Lists here). Although like GG has it’s own mobile apps on Android and iOS. I think the strength of this site could be discoverability of games through it’s community provided it gains an active and large enough audience.

I definitely want to keep an eye on both websites to see how they develop as they both look very promising.

I’ve also adding a short summary list of all the Game Trackers I’ve tried to my new updated Backlog page (was called Rules before).

A changing of the guard

Over the festive period the retailer HMV in the UK announced it was going into administration. Whilst in no way personally affected it did trigger some slightly irrational thoughts on what format I wanted to still buy films on. In the run up to Christmas I had purchased a few movies on Blu-Ray discs. However seeing the only national physical entertainment retailer in trouble (again) made me question whether it is time to finally adopt buying movies on digital. In part because there will inevitably be less choice where to buy a movie on disc as time goes by.

I’ve been a Steam user since the very early days (17 Sept 2003 – only 6 days missed!). Over the years I’ve watched Steam grow from a multiplayer network replacing the old WON system to the feature rich digital platform we know today. It continues to be the only PC Storefront or Gaming Client that automatically starts with my PC and has since the Windows XP days. It is where I gravitate towards when looking to buy any new PC game. But slowly it feels like that relationship might be under strain.

The news that Ubisoft won’t be releasing it games on Steam anymore isn’t necessarily a surprise. However the manner Ubisoft reached an agreement with Epic and will release games on the Epic Games Store alongside its own gaming client; UPlay certainly was a shock. It now means that some of the biggest western Publishers; Activision Blizzard, Electronic Arts, Ubisoft and Bethesda Games Studios no longer release games on Steam.

It’s probably only a matter of time for 2K and Take 2 Interactive (Rockstar) to follow. Indeed what are the odds now for Borderlands 3, an Unreal Engine game to follow suite. Probably a very likely outcome.

So why does this matter? One of the strengths of Steam was arguably having all your PC games in one place. Along with automatic updates, friends, voice chat etc. However if the games you want aren’t on the platform, then it doesn’t matter how good or feature rich the store is.

Certainly I’ve not been completely bought in to everything Valve has implemented on Steam. I hate the microtransactions they have implemented within the store itself (cards for badges). And crucially I also feel they missed a trick with in-game comms and streaming that has seen the rise of the new standards; Discord and Twitch.

Therefore for the first time ever I suddenly feel like I’m faced with the question of where should I be buying my next PC game from and hence my opening paragraph. Like my decision with movies for the first time ever I question if Steam is the best place to buy games. For example would Humble or GOG be better. With large western publishers and even some of the (bigger) indies rushing to a new PC Storefront there is now uncertainty around the Steam ecosystem. And certainly the fact developers receive 88% of revenue from the Epic Game Store is something that I am happy to support. But it is so disappointing that the dream of all games in one place is now most definitely over (arguably it was anyway) and it’s a case of installing multiply different PC gaming clients just to play a PC game.

I won’t be rushing overnight to rebuy all my games on any new PC Storefront but all of this does make me slightly lose faith in PC gaming. Along with the increase in certain hardware prices this is making me not inclined to buy new PC games. And indeed thankful that on my consoles all my games are in one place. With only one store to buy from.

My most anticipated games for 2019 (Updated)

With a new year upon us, I thought it might be wise to look forward to the video games I am most looking forward to that are coming out in the next 12-months. I have realised buying games at release isn’t always the best idea so I may pick up later on but will still be watching closely to see the reception to these. There aren’t a huge number of games this year that I’m that hyped for but the following nine games are the most interesting to me.

The Division 2 | Ubisoft – I have written about this one before. I loved the original game and this should probably be an automatic day-one purchase but I still have a few concerns; will monetisation be more aggressive, will the PvE end-game be focused on group activities, and will it have enough content for a more casual solo PvE player such as myself. Again these are probably questions that won’t be answered until after the game is out.

Updated 9th February: Private Beta impressions here.

Anthem | Electronic Arts – I may forgo this game given its proximity to the above. But still a game I’m intrigued by as it ticks a lot of the right boxes although I am nervous about how monetisation will work, as with most ‘triple AAA’ games these days.

Updated 3rd February: Demo impressions here. Not as interested in Anthem although still a little intrigued.

Days Gone | Sony Interactive Entertainment – Sony’s first party games have generally been massive critical successes this generation so this is definitely of interest.

Doom Eternal | Bethesda Games Studios – I still need to play Doom properly and complete it, but more of the excellent 2016 first person shooter should only be a good thing.

Outer Worlds | Obsidian Entertainment – I only stumbled upon this game (and the game below) following the recent uproar over the Epic games store launch. This has been compared to the Fallout games and looks really intriguing.

Rebel Galaxy Outlaw | Double Damage Games – Space adventure game inspired by the likes of Wing Commander: Privateer. I used to love games like Wing Commander and Freelancer and this looks like a more modern version of the above.

Warcraft III: Reforged | Blizzard Activision – A game I missed at release and have never been able to get that far into despite the multiple times I’ve tried to play it. Therefore I was chuffed to bits when Blizzard announced this PC remaster at Blizzcon 2018.

Rage 2 | Bethesda Games Studios – I’m not entirely sold on this one so probably the lowest priority game on my list. Partly because it looks very ‘Doom-ey’ in the FPS gunplay and more of the same as the original. That said it looks to be more sandbox/open-world by design. I have enjoyed the original although it’s far from a classic so it might be an ideal game to wait on.

Possibly not 2019 releases (as currently no confirmed release dates)

Last of Us 2 | Sony Interactive Entertainment – For one reason, and one reason alone I’m generally hyped for this game. And that’s the stunning E3 2018 reveal. One of the few games that did leave me reasonably speechless. It looks stunning.

Cyberpunk 2077 | CD Projekt Red – I’ve stayed away from seeking much details of this game so genuinely don’t know much at all about it. But CD Projekt Red’s recent pedigree alone makes this of note. Also probably one of the most hyped games there is coming out.

Updated 16th January: A few extra games that I hadn’t initially known or thought about

The Elder Scrolls Online: Elsweyr | Zenimax Online Studio – Just announced to be releasing on 4th June 2019 (however early access for PC/Mac players). ESO is one of the MMO’s I’ve been playing over the past few years and this might be a good point to try and catch up on some of the content. I’ve written about this game before and regard it as one of the strongest PVE MMO’s there is.

Resident Evil 2 (remake) | Capcom – I’m not a horror game fan and haven’t played a Resident Evil game since 4 on the Nintendo Gamecube. However I do have fond memories of the first and second games on the PlayStation 1 all those years ago. Indeed the second game was arguably the high-point for the series or at the very least is right up there for consideration. The recent demo has got me intrigued to see this game and unlike the recent 7 or 1/Zero remakes might actually pull me back into the series at some point.